Goliath nameplate

Our Trains

We own a range of locomotives and industrial vehicles - from steam train loco's to diesel loco's plus various utility vehicles used for maintenance of the track and on our adjoining land plus movement of carriages and other rolling stock on the line.

75014 braveheart - IN SERVICE 2021

Built December 1951 in Swindon
Withdrawn British Railways 1966

The British Railway 4-6-0 standard class 4 was built for use on the Western, Midland and Southern regions of the recently nationalised rail network. They were extremely versatile mixed traffic locos, frequently used on passenger duties.

75014 was allocated to a number of Midland region sheds during its short life and 1964 saw it allocated to Shrewsbury from where it was withdrawn and sent to Barry scrap yard in December 1966. In Barry scrap yard for fourteen years, it rotted and donated parts to other locos, until it was bought as a wreck in 1981. A four man syndicate based on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway brought it back to steam in 1994. The syndicate decided to sell the loco in 2002 and the Dartmouth Steam Railway & River Boat Company were fortunate to become the new owners. Although only arriving in 2002, the locomotive's boiler certificate expired in 2004 and the loco received a major overhaul, especially to the boiler, requiring many new parts, including a complete new boiler barrel. The overhaul took many years eventually seeing a return to service in December 2016. Braveheart is now a mainstay to the services on the Dartmouth Steam Railway.

Technical Details

Designer R A Riddles
Driving Wheels 5' 8" (1.73m)
Length 50' (15.24m)
Weight 111 tons
Tank Capacity 3,500 gal (13,249ltr)
Cylinders 18" x 28" (457mm x 711mm)
Boiler Pressure 225psi
Coal Capacity 6 tons

5239 Goliath - IN SERVICE 2021

Built August 1924 in Swindon
Withdrawn British Railways 1963

This class of locomotive was designed for use on heavy coal trains in the Welsh valleys, although two of the class were allocated to St Blazey in Cornwall for china clay traffic. 5239 was based at Neath for all of its working life being withdrawn from there in 1963 and sent to Barry scrap yard.

Rescued by the Dart Valley Railway, it arrived at Newton Abbot in June 1973 where most of the restoration work was carried out. In June 1976 it was transferred to Paignton for completion, entering traffic in 1978.

Technical Details

Designer C B Collett
Driving Wheels 4' 7" (1.4m)
Pony Wheels 3' 2" (0.96m)
Length 40' 9" (12.42m)
Weight 82 tons
Tank Capacity 1,800 gal (8183ltr)
Cylinders (2) 19" x 30" (482mm x 762mm)
Boiler Pressure 200psi
Coal Capacity 4 tons

2253 oMAHA - IN SERVICE 2021

During the Second World War the whole railway system was under constant barrage from air attack and the United States Army Transport Corps was instructed to design and construct a class of locomotives suitable to haul heavy freight trains, initially in the UK, and subsequently across Europe and Africa. The total number built was over 2100. They were designed to be used for a single purpose - to move American and Allied supplies and troops all over the world, also they were expected to be disposable. The expected working life of each loco was intended to be just 90 days!
At least 25 have survived into preservation globally, with 8 being in the UK. No. 2253 was built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1943, being shipped to Britain in May 1943. Following the invasion of Europe by Allied troops, it was shipped to France in September 1944, working throughout Europe. At the end of hostilities, it was sold to the Polish State Railway, seeing many more years of service.
Following a private purchase in 2013 she underwent an extensive major overhaul and steamed again in July 2019, also receiving the name “Omaha”, in honour of the owners father who was involved in the D-Day landings on Omaha Beach. It is currently on a ten-year lease to the Dartmouth Steam Railway.

Technical Details

Designer Major J W Marsh
Driving Wheels 4' 9" (1.448m)
Pony Wheels 2' 9" (0.838m)
Length 61' (18.59m)
Weight 124 tons (12cwt)
Tender Tank Capacity 5400 gals (24,500ltr)
Cylinders 19" x 26" (482mm x 660mm)
Boiler Pressure 225psi
Tender Coal Capacity 8 tons

observation car, devon belle

Following the Second World War, the Southern Railway was keen to promote leisure travel. In June 1947, it introduced a new Pullman service from London to Ilfracombe. A unique feature of this service was an observation carriage on the rear of the train. There were two of these carriages, one for each of the trains to and from London. The service was short lived, and the service was withdrawn in 1954 and both observation saloons were transferred to the Midland region, with Car 13 being used on the Land Cruise, Welsh Chieftain service in North Wales. In 1961, a further move saw both cars transferred to Scotland, seeing service on the route to Kyle of Lockalsh. They were both withdrawn in 1968, car 14 went to America with Flying Scotsman, but our Car 13 came to Devon, being used on the Buckfastleigh to Totnes branch, now The South Devon Railway, and was transferred to the Paignton line in the early 1980`s and has been in service continuously apart from periods of maintenance.

D6975 DIESEL LOCOMOTIVE

D6975 is a member of the Class 37 diesels. Built in April 1965, she saw service throughout British Railways - some Class 37 loco's still being in mainline service. This loco is powerful enough to operate any service train on our railway but is mainly used for moving stock along the full length of the line, use in winter engineering trains and assisting heavy charter trains on our steep gradients. Also she can be put into service at short notice in the unusual event of a steam loco becoming unavailable.

4555 Warrior - on loan to East Somerset 2021

4555 was built at Swindon and started its working life in 1924 at Tyseley depot. It was built with outside steam pipes, enlarged bunker and improved superheating unlike earlier members of the class which were modified later.

In the 1960's, 4555 worked occasionally on the Dart Valley branch and headed the last BR freight train on the line in 1962. It was purchased, in working order, for preservation straight from BR service in1965 and was the first engine to arrive on the newly preserved line in 1965. She hauled the official opening train on the Dart Valley Railway with Dr Beeching aboard in 1969.

After an extensive overhaul it was hired to the East Somerset Railway from 2020 for a two year period.

Technical Details

Designer G J Churchward
Driving Wheels 4' 7" (1.41m)
Pony Wheels 3' 2" (0.965m)
Length 36' 4" (11.09m)
Weight 57 tons
Tank Capacity 1050 gal (4773ltr)
Cylinders 17" x 24" (432mm x 610mm)
Boiler Pressure 200psi
Coal Capacity 3 tons

7827 Lydham Manor - awaiting REFURBISHMENT PROGRAMME

Built December 1950 in Swindon
Withdrawn British Railways 1965

The 'Manors' were the smallest and lightest of the Great Western Railway's 4-6-0 and were built for use on secondary lines such as the North Wales Cambrian Coast. The original design for the Manors was made in 1938, but there was an order for ten more to be built in 1950. 7827 is an example of the later batch and, though un-mistakably a GWR 4-6-0, it is actually a British Railways locomotive.

In 1966 Lydham went to Woodhams yard in Barry and was rescued in 1970 and went to Newton Abbot for restoration. 7827 made a return to service in 1973, ready for the first main season of the then Torbay Steam Railway, now the Dartmouth Steam Railway & River Boat Company.

Lydham's claim to fame is that it once hauled the royal train in the late 1950's, with its sister, 7828 Odney Manor.

Technical Details

Designer G J Churchward
Driving Wheels 5' 8" (17.2m)
Length 61' 9" (18.82m)
Weight 108 tons, 19 cwt
Tank Capacity 3500 gal (15,911ltr)
Cylinders 18" x 30" (457mm x 762mm)
Boiler Pressure 225psi
Coal Capacity 3 tons

4277 HERCULES - undergoing refurbishment programme

Built December 1920 in Swindon
Withdrawn British Railways 1964

This class of locomotive was designed for use on heavy coal trains in the Welsh valleys, although two of the class were allocated to St. Blazey in Cornwall for china clay traffic. 4277 was based at Aberbeeg for most of its working life being withdrawn from there in 1964 and sent to Barry scrapyard. For 22 years 4277 lay rusting in Barry scrapyard near Cardiff until it was rescued in June 1986 and restored to full working order in private ownership.It has been used on many heritage railways around the country since then.The PDSR bought the loco in 2008 after a major overhaul from its original owner for exclusive use on the railway.4277 is the sister of another of our locos, 5239 Goliath.

Technical Details

Designer G J Churchward
Driving Wheels 4' 7½" (1.41m)
Pony Wheels 3' 2" (0.965m)
Length 40' 5" (12.32m)
Weight 82 tons, 12 cwt
Tank Capacity 1,800 gal (8183ltr)
Cylinders 18.5" x 30" (470x762mm)
Boiler Pressure 200psi
Coal Capacity 4 tons

Reviews

  • Great family fun - It was brilliant with our 2yo - she was so excited to see the trains and the view along the journey was beautiful. The commentary on the boat was well delivered. Would highly recommend!
  • Absolutely fabulous experience - The whole day was fabulous with great weather and steam trains. The line is one of the most scenic you will ever experience and is a must visit if in the area. I will definitely be back again :-)
  • All lovely - All done very well. Everything clean (train/boats), staff friendly and commentary on the river cruise added a bit of fun. Really good day out, lots of families. Take hats, drinks and dogs! If you have one.

Read more reviews on TripAdvisor